Friday, September 21, 2012 Tuesday, July 31, 2012
Things of note:
That the Jewish diaspora is far less apportioned around the world than ever before (in modern times), since 81pc of world Jewry now reside in either Israel or the United States;
The population of North Africa shrunk into non-existence between 1948 and 1970, a consequence of the founding of the State of Israel and the anti-Jewish pogroms which followed;
The explosion of Israel’s Jewish population between 1970 and 2010, coinciding with the mass exodus of Jews from the former Soviet Union;
That more Jews now live in Great Britain, Canada, and France than in the Russian Federation; and
That in spite of Israel’s founding, the Jewish populations of North America, Latin America, and Western Europe have remained relatively stable.

Things of note:

  • That the Jewish diaspora is far less apportioned around the world than ever before (in modern times), since 81pc of world Jewry now reside in either Israel or the United States;
  • The population of North Africa shrunk into non-existence between 1948 and 1970, a consequence of the founding of the State of Israel and the anti-Jewish pogroms which followed;
  • The explosion of Israel’s Jewish population between 1970 and 2010, coinciding with the mass exodus of Jews from the former Soviet Union;
  • That more Jews now live in Great Britain, Canada, and France than in the Russian Federation; and
  • That in spite of Israel’s founding, the Jewish populations of North America, Latin America, and Western Europe have remained relatively stable.
Monday, February 13, 2012

The most enduring physical presence might be the Mikrorayon,  gray apartment blocks originally built for Soviet administrators and  the Afghan elite that stand amid the central suburbs of Kabul.
Also bearing the bullet and shell marks of the battles of the 1990s,  they are cramped, run-down and patched, with clothing lines stretching  haphazardly from windows to nearby trees. But the Mikrorayon are still  some of the most prized homes for Kabul’s educated and wealthier middle  class — a fact reflected in the loud street billboards for cellphones  and private schools, and in the presence of young women walking the  sidewalks in leg-hugging jeans unencumbered by the traditional dress.
“It is a safe place,” said Shir Mohammad Basheer, 50, a school principal  who was fixing his car outside the four-room apartment that he shares  with his wife and six children. “We have running water. We have  electricity. We have central heating.”
“To be honest, Russia did this great work for Afghanistan,” he said. “We  have not seen anything big built by the international coalition.”

(Andrea Bruce/The New York Times)

The most enduring physical presence might be the Mikrorayon, gray apartment blocks originally built for Soviet administrators and the Afghan elite that stand amid the central suburbs of Kabul.

Also bearing the bullet and shell marks of the battles of the 1990s, they are cramped, run-down and patched, with clothing lines stretching haphazardly from windows to nearby trees. But the Mikrorayon are still some of the most prized homes for Kabul’s educated and wealthier middle class — a fact reflected in the loud street billboards for cellphones and private schools, and in the presence of young women walking the sidewalks in leg-hugging jeans unencumbered by the traditional dress.

“It is a safe place,” said Shir Mohammad Basheer, 50, a school principal who was fixing his car outside the four-room apartment that he shares with his wife and six children. “We have running water. We have electricity. We have central heating.”

“To be honest, Russia did this great work for Afghanistan,” he said. “We have not seen anything big built by the international coalition.”

(Andrea Bruce/The New York Times)

Thursday, December 29, 2011
A young Lithuanian girl sits on the toppled statue  of Russian Bolshevik revolutionary leader Vladimir Lenin in Vilnius  after the monument was removed from the center of the Lithuanian  capital, on September 1, 1991.
(Gerard Fouet/AFP/Getty Images)

A young Lithuanian girl sits on the toppled statue of Russian Bolshevik revolutionary leader Vladimir Lenin in Vilnius after the monument was removed from the center of the Lithuanian capital, on September 1, 1991.

(Gerard Fouet/AFP/Getty Images)

Saturday, October 15, 2011
Silence is equivalent to death. Boris Kochubievsky